Aug 222014
 

Entering Lake George from the south
9 July 2014, continued.  This is the approach to the village of Lake George from the south.  The lake itself is off to the right side of the road. I didn’t get any photos of it.  I now wish I had.

I’ve been spending a lot of time comparing the explanations of Henry Schoolcraft, Willard Glazier, and Jacob Brower.   Brower says the original name of it was Lake Naiwa.  On his 1881 expedition Glazier gave that name to a different, nearby Lake (but named this one after his brother, George Glazier).  Brower said Glazier plagarized from Henry Schoolcraft, and didn’t give him credit.  I’ve been reading Schoolcraft’s account of his 1832 expedition, and am not able to tell which lake he thought was Lake Naiwa.

And I’m still not sure why Brower and the Minnesota Historical Society were so outraged by Glazier’s work.  I know some of their explanations, but that doesn’t mean I understand the depth of their rancor.

And then there is the question of whether Naiwa really meant snake.  Brower and Glazier both seem to have got that idea from Schoolcraft.  Schoolcraft, who could speak Ojibwe, implied that that was the meaning.  But he didn’t say so directly.   Usually it’s a word segment that means “middle,” as in the first part of the name Naawaquegezhik (who was also known around my part of Michigan as Noonday). The Nichols/Nyholm dictionary also gives that as the meaning, and such words as I’ve found for snake are very different.  But languages are complicated, and that doesn’t mean that Schoolcraft (or his guide, Ozawindib) wasn’t making some connection between Naiwa and snake.

For right now, I wish I could find where somebody has traced the last part of Schoolcraft’s 1832 expedition to Lake Itasca on a modern map.   His expedition definitely came down the stream that feeds out of Lake George, but how far?  It’s a stream that’s fed by more sources than Lake George.

Lake George is at the topmost of the square markers.

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Emmaville

Emmaville

9 July 2014.  Lake George Town Hall was one of the destinations for my second township ride.  Three miles beyond the Lake Emma Town Hall that I had visited two days earlier, I happened upon a little place on the road called Emmaville, with a convenience store on one side of the road and Emmaville [...]

Nevis Township, Hubbard County, MN

Nevis Township, Hubbard County, MN

7 Jul 2014, continued.  The third and last township for the day was Nevis. Nevis doesn’t have a town hall.  Instead, it uses the Senior Center in the village of Nevis (pictured above) for meetings and as a voting place.  Not all townships in Minnesota, or even in Michigan, have town halls.  I’m probably not [...]

Mantrap Town Hall in Hubbard County

Mantrap Town Hall in Hubbard County

7 July 2014. After leaving Lake Emma Town Hall and surviving the deerflies on 250th street (a gravel road) I got to Hwy 40 where I was able to outrun them.   It was even safe to stop and get a photo of this sign.  Until I saw it, I hadn’t realized Mantrap Town Hall was [...]

Cass County Township Halls - Part 1

Cass County Township Halls – Part 1

This week’s bicycling consisted of a three-day ride to township halls, mostly in Cass County, Michigan.  At three of the township halls, I was fortunate enough to to visit briefly with some of the township officials and employees.  In one case it was a township treasurer who came out to see what I was doing, [...]

Church Buggies on Quincy Grange Road

Church Buggies on Quincy Grange Road

The latest Amish America article about fancy young people’s buggies (Growing Up Amish Excerpt: Youngie, Buggies & Horses) made me think of this scene in Branch County from a couple of Sundays ago.  I was riding from one township hall to another (more on that another time) and came upon a gathering of Amish buggies [...]